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20130318
20130326
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included energy infrastructure, levies, and inland waterways. inland waterways getting a d-minus, barely above a failing grade. how, if you know, does the u.s. infrastructure compare with that of other countries? in some surveys, very poorly, i believe. >> well, what we do know is that our infrastructure is a part of our competitiveness in the world. if we want to be competitive we need to invest. we can look at things such as china investing some 9% in their infrastructure. europe investing 5% of their gdp in infrastructure. yet you look at the united states, and we're down around 2%. and that's about half of what we invested 50 years ago. >> what about bridges? where -- how -- you know, there have been major stories having to do with the safety of our bridges, that major collapse in minneapolis a few years ago, are they getting better or not? >> yes. they're actually getting better. they improved over our 2009 report card. again, reflecting an increase investment in bridges. we're seeing that around the nation as local leaders step up and start replacing bridges that need to be replace
on in the u.s. you have the manufacturing renaissance. you have really an energy bonanza. so i think the market can gon higher. i think there's a real risk of having too much money in nonproductive assets on the sidelines. >> doug, for a long time, individual investors were fearful of the markets and saying they were too scared to get into the markets. and now they're so scared that they've missed this rally. what do you say to your clients when they bring up this question? is it too late to buy in now? >> in the year 2000, year 2007 and now again today, the s&p was at about 1550. what i would point out is those were different valuations. in 2000 the market was trading nearly 30 times earnings. in 2007 it was about 16 or 17 times earnings, and today it's about 14 times earnings. so the stocks, there's much more earnings underlying them providing a foundation for valuations. so i believe one, is valuations are fair, and then we see central banks around the world have kept interest rates low in printing money. in the end those dollars will flow into stocks and make them go higher. >>
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)